Saturday, July 9, 2016

AL UDEID AIR BASE, QATAR Firefighters beat the heat

Firefighters beat the heat
Staff Sgt. Kevin Vaughn, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, operates the Oshkosh Striker crash truck on the flight line June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The striker carries 3,000 gallons of water and 420 gallons of firefighting foam. It can discharge the water or foam from a roof turret, which flows 1,250 gallons per minute, or a front bumper mounted turret, which flows 300 gpm. The AUAB fire department is the busiest in the Air Force based on call volume. The warm weather here places additional stress on systems that sometimes results in the outbreak of a fire, such as motors running hotter on vehicles or electrical systems overheating when under high demand. Additionally, unlike at home station, the 379th ECES fire department works with coalition partners and host nation partners in support of several types of aircraft on base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

AL UDEID AIR BASE, QATAR
07.07.2016
Story by Senior Airman Janelle Patiño
379th Air Expeditionary Wing

Airmen from the 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department provide word-class fire and emergency service where they protect lives and properties from all hazards. In addition, they also provide premier fire and emergency services and host a robust fire prevention and education program here.

The AUAB fire department is the busiest in the Air Force based on call volume. Additionally, unlike at home station, fire department Airmen work with coalition and host nation partners in support of several types of aircraft on base.

Firefighters beat the heat
Staff Sgt. Gregory Mazzone, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, and Tech. Sgt. Gabriel Boulware, 379th ECES crew chief, repack the 1 ¾-inch hand line from Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Repacking a hand line requires certain hose lines loaded in specific ways for different situations. Ensuring the hose is placed back on the Engine 21 correctly is critical to its rapid deployment at the next emergency where it is needed. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Staff Sgt. Josh Patterson, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron Engine 21 operator, increases the throttle of Engine 21’s fire pump to the appropriate pressure of 120 pounds per square inch, which is the required pressure for a 1 ¾-inch hand line June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Due to the warm weather, many of the fires occur outside to include fires in dumpsters, large generators overheating and catching fire and fuel spills caused by heat-expanded fuel that overflows out of aircraft fuel vents. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Staff Sgt. Josh Patterson, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron Engine 21 operator, operates the fire pump of Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Fire pump operators go through training and classroom time to understand how a fire pump functions and how to effectively operate it. Firefighters conduct training daily to improve their response to building fires, aircraft fires, rescuing people from auto accidents, hazardous materials incidents and technical rescue to prepare for different types of emergencies that can occur on base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Senior Airman Dashawn Gilford, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, advances a 1 ¾-inch hand line, which sprays in a fog pattern June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Most Air Force and Department of Defense firefighters work 72 consecutive hours each week providing fire and emergency services to the aircraft and the base. The 379th ECES fire department works with coalition partners and host nation partners in support of several types of aircraft on base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Senior Airman Dashawn Gilford, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, stretches a 1-3/4 inch hand line, which flows approximately 150 gallons per minute, from the side of the Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 100-foot hand line is broken into 50-foot lengths and is drained of water and rolled to remove air after each use. The hose lengths are then reattached and loaded back onto the engine neatly and correctly to ensure a smooth deployment when an emergency arises. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Senior Airman Dashawn Gilford, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons his personal protective equipment prior to stretching a 1 ¾-inch hand line from the side of the Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Firefighters place their personal protective equipment onto the fire truck and inspect their self-contained breathing apparatus in preparation for each work shift. Fire truck operators also inspect and start the truck to ensure the vehicle is ready for service and nothing is broken or missing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Senior Airman Dashawn Gilford, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons his self-contained breathing apparatus face piece prior to operating a hand line from Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. There is more than one fire station here to provide adequate coverage and quick response time based on the geography of the base and volume of calls. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Senior Airman Dashawn Gilford, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, dons his personal protective equipment prior to stretching a 1 ¾-inch hand line from the side of Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 379th ECES fire department consists of enlisted personnel from Active Duty, Air National Guard and Reserve units. Its structure mirrors most fire departments both in the military and civilian world to include a fire chief, deputy fire chief, training chief, fire prevention and inspection division and emergency communications center crew chiefs. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Staff Sgt. Josh Patterson, 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron Engine 21 operator, adjusts a scene light prior to operating the fire pump on Engine 21 June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The fire department here is the busiest fire department in the Air Force based on call volume. Despite their operations tempo, the firefighters also assist with fire sprinkler system maintenance and teach fire safety to school children at the American School of Doha. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Master Sgt. Amy Hartman, 379th Expeditionary Medical Operations Squadron mental health NCO in charge, briefs firefighters of the 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron at Fire Station 3 during their weekly roll call held June 24, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 379th ECES fire department provides word-class fire and emergency service where they protect lives and properties from all hazards. In addition, they also provide premier fire and emergency services and host robust fire prevention and education program. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)
Firefighters beat the heat
Members of the 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordnance disposal pass through the technical decontamination corridor to ensure all contaminants are washed off of the responders during a hazardous materials exercise March 16, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Members from the fire department, explosive ordnance disposal unit, bio-environmental engineering and emergency management participated in the exercise to respond to a simulated reported explosion inside a building and safely inspect the area of any hazardous material. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jared Mumma/Released)